Jewellery

Greek Jewellery from Mycenae

Recently I visited Victoria & Albert Museum, London and saw a wonderful collection of jewellery from the Bronze Age to the modern times. For this month we want to show our selection of Ancient Greek jewellery. We hope you enjoy this presentation of intricate and elaborate art techniques from the past.

Gold Diadem. In 1876 a self-taught excavator named Heinrich Schliemann began to investigate a group of graves inside the citadel of Mycenae. He had already established that there was more than a grain of truth in the epic stories of the Trojan War, and now he turned his attention to a search for Agamemnon, the rich and powerful leader of the Greek army. The grave circle at Mycenae produced a fabulous treasure that amply explained his mistaken declaration, “I have gazed on the face of Agamemnon.” He was several centuries out, but there can be no doubt of the wealth and power of the man who wore this astonishing crown.



先日ロンドンにあるヴィクトリア アンド アルバート装飾美術館へ行き、宝石コレクションを堪能してきました。青銅器時代から現代まで幅広く収集された見事な宝石類に感激、今月のフェイスブックは古代ギリシャの宝石を小社のコレクションからご紹介したいと思います。


1876年、独学で遺跡発掘を始めたドイツ人のシュリーマンは、ミケーネの要塞にある墓の調査をはじめました。すでにトロイヤ戦争の壮大な物話の中に書かれていた事実を証明していた彼は、今度はギリシャ軍の指揮官である、富裕で権力を持っていた、アガメムノンの財宝に目を向けました。彼の予測どおりミケーネの円頂墓には見事な宝物が保蔵されていました。アガメヌノンの顔を見つめてきたと、宣言したシュリーマン、実はアガメヌノンはシュリーマンが発見した宝物の年代より数世紀前に生存していたので、誤った宣言をしたことになりますが、この素晴らしい王冠を見ると、富と権力を持った人物が存在したという事実は疑う余地がありません。

Mycenaean gold diadem from Grave Circle. 1700-1500 BC. National Archaeological Museum, Athens ©Ronald Sheridan/Ancient Art & Architecture Collection

Mycenaean gold diadem from Grave Circle. 1700-1500 BC.
National Archaeological Museum, Athens
©Ronald Sheridan/Ancient Art & Architecture Collection

 

Silver and Gold bracelet

It is sometimes suggested that in the Bronze Age world, silver was even more valuable than gold. This is perhaps explained by the fact that it is so much more complex and difficult to process. A simple technique of washing and heating was often enough for gold, but for silver crushing, washing and filtering was only the beginning of a series of procedures to remove sulphur, tin, arsenic, copper and antimony. Only then could pure metal be obtained to work into pieces like this massive armlet, with its gold flower mounted on the silver hoop. It was clearly designed to be worn by a man on his upper arm, as its diameter is 9.3 cm.



青銅器時代では、銀は金よりも価値があったと示唆されることが時々あります。これはおそらくその製造工程が、複雑かつ困難な点がその理由として考えれます。多くの場合、洗浄、加熱の単純な技術で十分な金と、それに比べて銀は、硫黄、錫、砒素、銅そしてアンチモニーを除去するために一連の工程があり、その最初に砕き、洗浄し、そして濾過する作業があるのです。この工程を経て得られた、純粋な金属が、以下の写真にある巨大な腕輪などの装飾品をつくるために使われます。銀の輪の上にのった金の花で飾られたこの腕輪は、直径9.3cmで、この大きさから、男性の上腕にはめられるようにデザインされたものだといえます。

Silver and Gold bracelet with rosetta ornament. Shaft Graves Mycenae. Bronze Age. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. ©Ronald Sheridan/Ancient Art & Architecture Collection

Silver and Gold bracelet with rosetta ornament. Shaft Graves Mycenae. Bronze Age.
National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
©Ronald Sheridan/Ancient Art & Architecture Collection

Octopus ornament

The opening of the Bronze Age called for a massive expansion in maritime movement as new materials and techniques were traded. The products of the age show a keen interest in the life of the sea, and its decorative potential was clearly recognised by the artisits and craftsmen of Mycenae. A group of gold octopuss from the Grave Circle have been cut out of thin gold and were probably sewn onto fabric, but it is clear that the goldsmith was more of an artist than a biologist since the octopus is shown with seven instead of eight tentacles.



青銅器時代の始まりとともに、大規模な海上移動が盛んになり、それによって新しい資材や技術が取引されるようになりました。この時代の作品から、当時のミケーネのアーティストや職人たちが海の生態に関心を持ち、作品のモチーフやデザインに取り入れられると考えていたことが伺えます。ミケーネの円頂墓で発見された、一連の金のたこは、薄い金を切り取り、多分生地に縫い付けたものです。金細工師は生物学者というよりはアーティストで、たこの足(触手)が8本ではなく7本になっていることからも明らかです。

Cut out octopus ornament, Grave Circle, Mycenae. 1700-1500 BC. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. ©Ronald Sheridan/Ancient Art & Architecture Collection

Cut out octopus ornament, Grave Circle, Mycenae. 1700-1500 BC.
National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
©Ronald Sheridan/Ancient Art & Architecture Collection

Gold pendant from Crete

With the collapse of the mighty Bronze Age kingdoms, Greece retreated into a period of illiteracy and reduced life style often called the Dark Age. However, the darkness is occasionally pierced by some gleams of gold like this remarkable pendant, found in an excavation near to Knossos in Crete. Each end of the pendant terminates in a highly stylised human head, typical of the art of the early seventh century BC, and within the coiling framework are four figures of water birds, probably geese, which were a popular motif at this time.



強大な青銅器時代の崩壊に伴い、ギリシャは文字資料が乏しい、社会状況が落ち込んだ暗黒時代に入ります。しかし時折暗闇の世界に、この写真のペンダントのように、一条の金の光が差し込むこともありました。クレタ島のクノッソス近辺で発掘されたもので、円形をしたフレームの上部には、高度な技術で様式化された、紀元前7世紀初期の典型的なスタイルの、人間の頭が両端に飾られています。またフレームワークの中には、この時代によく使われたモチーフの水鳥、多分がちょうでしょうか、が4羽が見えます。

Gold pendant, Crete. 700-600 BC. Herakleion Museum, Crete. ©Ronald Sheridan/Ancient Art & Architecture Collection Sheridan/Ancient Art & Architecture Collection

Gold pendant, Crete. 700-600 BC. Herakleion Museum, Crete.
©Ronald Sheridan/Ancient Art & Architecture Collection
Sheridan/Ancient Art & Architecture Collection